Collaborators

Academic Collaborators

Kalzang Bhutia

Kalzang Bhutia is currently a TLKY Visiting Scholar of Buddhist Studies at the University of Toronto Scarborough. He completed his graduate education in Buddhist studies, history and law at the University of Delhi. His research interests include Buddhist history and culture in Sikkim, transnational Buddhist networks, and indigenous environmentalisms in the Himalayas.

Amy Holmes-Tagchungdarpa

Amy Holmes-Tagchungdarpa was the TLKY Visiting Professor of Buddhist Studies at the University of Toronto Scarborough, and is joining Grinnell College as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Religion. She is the author of the forthcoming study The Social Life of Tibetan Biography: Textuality, Community and Authority in the Lineage of Tokden Shakya Shri, which explores the creation of the transnational lineage of Khampa meditator teacher Tokden Shakya Shri at the turn of the twentieth century. Her other research interests include cultural production and community formation between Tibet, China, and the Himalayas. She is conducting several projects related to local community formation and language in the Eastern Himalayas.

Andrew J. May

Andrew J. May is Professor of History in the School of Historical & Philosophical Studies and Associate Dean (Research) at the University of Melbourne, Australia. His recent book Welsh missionaries and British imperialism: The Empire of Clouds in North-east India was published by Manchester University Press in 2012. He is currently developing a broader study of British policy, personnel and the politics of the past in the colonial construction of India’s northeast frontier.

Anna Sawerthal

Anna Sawerthal is currently a PhD candidate at the University of Heidelberg at the Cluster of Excellence Asia and Europe in a Global Context. Within the broader project Kalimpong as a Contact Zone, she studies early Tibetan-language newspapers, mainly focusing on the Yul phyogs so so'i gsar 'gyur me long, published from 1925 to 1963 in Kalimpong. She studies transformation and adaption processes of the European product of a newspaper into a Tibetan cultural sphere, incorporating theories and methods of media studies, social sciences, transcultural studies and historical studies. In this project she can combine interests she had developed through the years: She received a Mag.phil.-degree (MA) from Vienna University in the field of Tibetan and Buddhist Studies, studied Journalism and Media Management at the FH Wien (College of Applied Sciences Vienna), worked for different Austrian newspapers and spent three semesters at the Tibet University in Lhasa, studying Tibetan language. Already her MA thesis has undertaken a structural analysis of contents of the Yul phyogs so so'i gsar 'gyur me long and can be found online at Columbia University's Tharchin Collection.

Jayeeta (Jo) Sharma

Jayeeta Sharma (Jo) is the founder of the Eastern Himalaya Research Network, and an Associate Professor in the Department of Historical and Cultural Studies at the University of Toronto. She holds graduate appointments at the University of Toronto in the Departments of History, Religion, Diaspora and Transnational Studies, and the Asian Institute. She received her PhD from the University of Cambridge in 2003 for a dissertation on imperial tea plantations, commodity capitalism, and cultural nationalisms. She published her first book Empire’s Garden in 2011 from Duke University Press and Permanent Black, a finalist for the Berkshire First Book Prize. Her academic interests include migration, labour, gender, food, urban, and post-colonial cultures. She is the series editor of the Empires in Perspective book series from Pickering Chatto.http://www.pickeringchatto.com/series/46-empires-in-perspective

Jo's current research explores cross-cultural encounters and transnational Himalayan circulation with particular reference to the hill-station towns of Darjeeling and Kalimpong and the Eastern Himalayan region. Jayeeta works closely with the Digital Scholarship Unit at the University of Toronto Scarborough (UTSC), the digital home for this research network.

Markus Viehbeck

Markus Viehbeck is an Assistant Professor at the Cluster of Excellence "Asia and Europe in a Global Context," located at Heidelberg University. He earned his PhD from the University of Vienna (2012) with a study on the polemical exchange between 'Ju Mi pham and Dpa' ris Rab gsal, two eminent Tibetan intellectuals of the 19th century, concerning the correct interpretation of an Indian Buddhist key text. His research explores the migration, appropriation, and negotiation of knowledge with a focus on recent Tibetan intellectual history. In a new project he studies the Eastern Himalayas, in particular the town of Kalimpong, as a "contact zone" for enabling and shaping the production of knowledge between Tibet and the modern world of the early 20th century.

 

Research Assistants

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Local Partners and Community Collaboratos

Deepa Balsaver

Nandini Purandare and Deepa Balsaver are public intellectuals who in 2012 initiated the Sherpa Project on behalf of the Himalayan Club to record the oral history and collate recorded documents on the community of Sherpa climbers and their families in Darjeeling during the decades of early exploration and expeditions in the Himalaya. They are partnering with Jayeeta Sharma and the DSU to preserve and disseminate its valuable findings and archival holdings for posterity, alongside local Sherpa collaborators in India and Nepal, such as Dorjee Lhatoo.

Nandini Purandare

Nandini Purandare and Deepa Balsaver are public intellectuals who in 2012 initiated the Sherpa Project on behalf of the Himalayan Club to record the oral history and collate recorded documents on the community of Sherpa climbers and their families in Darjeeling during the decades of early exploration and expeditions in the Himalaya. They are partnering with Jayeeta Sharma and the DSU to preserve and disseminate its valuable findings and archival holdings for posterity, alongside local Sherpa collaborators in India and Nepal, such as Dorjee Lhatoo.

 

Institutes, Centres and Units

Digital Scholarship Unit at the UTSC Library

The Digital Scholarship Unit at the University of Toronto Scarborough Library functions as a laboratory for experimenting scholars who collaborate with expert library staff for research and instruction. The unit also ensures the interoperability and stewardship of data assets, and builds skills and capacity for digital scholarship.